Wine tasting Naples tour

Wine tasting Naples tour is the perfect excursion for the wine lovers.

The Campania region is famous around the world for it’s astonishing landscapes and deep blues sea dotted with the fabled islands on which, ancient tradition would have it, the Sirens dwelt and sang their songs to lure sailors to their doom.

In addition to this the Campania is also famous for its wines.

wine-tasting-naples

With wine tasting Naples tour, Rome to Amalfi Coast tours offers you various wine tours there where the wine lives before being produced: Irpinia, the Sannio Valley, Taurasi, the slopes of Vesuvius are just some of the areas where the quality wine of Campania is produced for centuries…
We offer you a special day of leisurely wandering among vineyards and wine cellars, sampling white, rose or red wines while feeling the cool breeze of the Vesuvius area or the Amalfi Coast.

In italy you can taste most grape varieties, the following is a list of the most important of Italy’s many grape varieties.

White wine:

Fiano: Grown on the southwest coast of Italy.
Greco di Tufo: Grown on the southwest coast of Italy.
Malvasia bianca: A white variety that occurs throughout Italy with many clones and mutations.
Pecorino: Native to Marche and Abruzzo, it is used in the Falerio dei Colli
Pigato: An acidic variety from Liguria, the wines are vinified to pair with seafood.
Pinot grigio: A successful commercial grape (known as Pinot Gris in France), its wines are characterized by crispness and cleanness. The wine can range from mild to full-bodied.
Trebbiano: This is the most widely planted white varietal in Italy. It is grown throughout the country, with a special focus on the wines from Abruzzo and from Lazio, including Frascati. Trebbiano from producers such as Valentini have been known to age for 15+ years. It is known as Ugni blanc in France.
Verdicchio: This is grown in the areas of Castelli di Jesi and Matelica in the Marche region and gives its name to the varietal white wine made from it. The name comes from “verde” (green). In the last few year Verdicchio wines are considered to be the best white wines of Italy.[12]
Vermentino: This is widely planted in Sardinia and also found in Tuscan and Ligurian coastal districts. The wines are a popular accompaniment to seafood.
Other important whites include Carricante, Coda de Volpe, Cortese, Falanghina, Grechetto, Grillo, Inzolia, Picolit, Traminer, Verduzzo, and Vernaccia, Gewürztraminer (sometimes called traminer aromatico), Sauvignon blanc, and others.

Red wine:

Sangiovese: vineyards in the Val d’Orcia, Monte Amiata in the background.
Aglianico del Vulture: Based on the Aglianico grape produced in the Vulture area of Basilicata. It was recognized as DOC in 1971 and DOCG in 2011.
Aglianico: Considered the “noble varietal of the south”, it is primarily grown in Basilicata and Campania. The name is probably derived from Hellenic, so it is considered a Greek transplant. The fruit is thick skinned and spicy fruit.
Barbera: The most widely grown red wine grape of Piedmont and Southern Lombardy, most cultivated around the towns of Asti, Alba, and Pavia. The vine has bright cherry-coloured fruit, and its wine is acidic with a dark color.
Corvina: Along with the varietals Rondinella and molinara, this is the principal grape which makes the famous wines of the Veneto: Valpolicella and Amarone. Valpolicella wine has dark cherry fruit and spice. After the grapes undergo passito (a drying process), the wine is now called Amarone, and is high in alcohol (16% and up) and characterized by raisin, prune, and syrupy fruits. Some Amarones can age for 40+ years and command spectacular prices. In December 2009, there was celebration when the acclaimed Amarone di Valpolicella was finally awarded its long-sought DOCG status. The same method used for Amarone is used for Recioto, the oldest wine produced in this area, but the difference is that Recioto is a sweet wine.
Dolcetto: A grape that grows alongside Barbera and Nebbiolo in Piedmont, its name means “little sweet one”, referring not to the taste of the wine, but the ease in which it grows and makes good wines suitable for everyday drinking. Flavors of concord grape, wild blackberries, and herbs permeate the wine.
Malvasia nera: Red Malvasia varietal from Piedmont. A sweet and perfumed wine, sometimes elaborated in the passito style.
Montepulciano: Not to be confused with the Tuscan town of Montepulciano; it is most widely planted grape on the opposite coast in Abruzzo. Its wines develop silky plum-like fruit, friendly acidity, and light tannin. More recently, producers have been creating a rich, inky, extracted version of this wine, a sharp contrast to the many inferior bottles produced in the past.
Nebbiolo: The most noble of Italy’s varieties. The name (meaning “little fog”) refers to the autumn fog that blankets most of Piedmont where Nebbiolo is chiefly grown, and where it achieves the most successful results. A difficult grape variety to cultivate, it produces the most renowned Barolo and Barbaresco, made in the province of Cuneo, along with the lesser-known Sforzato, Inferno and Sassella made in Valtellina, Ghemme and Gattinara, made in Vercelli’s province. Traditionally produced Barolo can age for fifty years-plus, and is regarded by many wine enthusiasts as the greatest wine of Italy.
Negroamaro: The name literally means “black bitter”. A widely planted grape with its concentration in the region of Puglia, it is the backbone of the Salice Salentino.
Nero d’Avola: This once-obscure native varietal of Sicily is gaining attention for its fruit and sweet tannins. The quality of Nero d’Avola has surged in recent years.
Primitivo: A red grape planted found in southern Italy, most notably in Apulia. Primitivo ripens early and thrives in warm climates, where it can achieve very high alcohol levels.
Sagrantino: A native of Umbria, it is planted on only 250 hectares, but the wines produced from it (either blended with Sangiovese as Rosso di Montefalco or as a pure Sagrantino) are world-renowned. These wines can age for many years.
Sangiovese: Italy’s claim to fame, the pride of Tuscany. It produces Chianti (Classico), Rosso di Montalcino, Brunello di Montalcino, Rosso di Montepulciano, Montefalco Rosso, and many others. Sangiovese is also the backbone in many of the acclaimed, modern-styled “Super-Tuscans”, where it is blended with Bordeaux varietals (Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Cabernet Franc) and typically aged in French oak barrels, resulting in a wine primed for the international market: oaky, high-alcohol, and a ripe, fruit-forward profile.

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GALLERY – WINE TASTING NAPLES

BASIC GLASS GUIDE – WINE TASTING NAPLES

 

 

Wine tasting Naples tour
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Wine tasting Naples tour last edit: 2017-11-11T22:19:35+00:00 renato cuomo